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Residents in Norman ask city council for mental health resources

Residents in Norman asked the city council for more mental health resources. Many knew Shannon Hanchett personally, the owner of a local cookie business. Hanchett died in the Cleveland County Jail last month. Friends of Hanchett made it clear they want to see more done for mental health in the city. The police department said they’re looking at it but plans are pending.| MORE | Cleveland County Detention Center inmate dies after suffering medical emergency “On the Griffin, Red Rock campus, there is a 24/7 facility. She could have easily been taken there,” said Sheri Gentry, a Norman resident. close friend, calling her death unnecessary. Hanchett, known as the ‘Cookie Queen,’ was the owner of the Cookie Cottage in Norman. “If our police need training let’s train them. If they need backup, let’s get them back up,” Gentry said. Police noted in her November arrest report that she was going through a mental health crisis at the time before her death in the Cleveland County Detention Center on Dec. 8.”We’ve started 2023 with two deaths in county custody in the last 30 days,” said Kate Bierman, business owner and former council member.| MORE | Beds for mental health patients were open during Norman ‘Cookie Queen’s’ arrestNorman police said they’re working on a program to transfer mental health calls directly to 988 staff. In some instances, officers may not need to respond to mental health calls. Bierman said she knew Hanchett well.”She incubated her Cookie Cottage with our coffee shop, and made the jump from the cottage industry to a commercial location,” Bierman said. She’d like to see mobile response units for mental health in Norman. Hanchett, and Kathryn Milano, both died in custody.Milano’s family said they had a protective order against her because of her “severe mental health issues.”Mayor Larry Heikkila said this week he does not think the mobile response program is a good idea, saying it’s not the city’s job and Cleveland County already has mental health resources. The mayor does plan to join the effort to finish jail renovations, which include a mental health addition.

Residents in Norman asked the city council for more mental health resources.

Many knew Shannon Hanchett personally, the owner of a local cookie business. Hanchett died in the Cleveland County Jail last month.

Friends of Hanchett made it clear they want to see more done for mental health in the city. The police department said they’re looking at it but plans are pending.

| MORE | Cleveland County Detention Center inmate dies after suffering medical emergency

“On the Griffin, Red Rock campus, there is a 24/7 facility. She could have easily been taken there,” said Sheri Gentry, a Norman resident.

Some Norman residents called Hanchett a close friend, calling her death unnecessary. Hanchett, known as the ‘Cookie Queen,’ was the owner of the Cookie Cottage in Norman.

On Tuesday, some people were asking the city council to give the police more help in the future.

“If our police need training let’s train them. If they need backup, let’s get them back up,” Gentry said.

Police noted in her November arrest report that she was going through a mental health crisis at the time before her death in the Cleveland County Detention Center on Dec. 8.

“We’ve started 2023 with two deaths in county custody in the last 30 days,” said Kate Bierman, business owner and former council member.

| MORE | Beds for mental health patients were open during Norman ‘Cookie Queen’s’ arrest

Norman police said they’re working on a program to transfer mental health calls directly to 988 staff. In some instances, officers may not need to respond to mental health calls.

Bierman said she knew Hanchett well.

“She incubated her Cookie Cottage with our coffee shop, and made the jump from the cottage industry to a commercial location,” Bierman said.

She’d like to see mobile response units for mental health in Norman. Hanchett, and Kathryn Milano, both died in custody.

Milano’s family said they had a protective order against her because of her “severe mental health issues.”

Mayor Larry Heikkila said this week he does not think the mobile response program is a good idea, saying it’s not the city’s job and Cleveland County already has mental health resources.

The mayor does plan to join the effort to finish jail renovations, which include a mental health addition.

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