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Fitness coach Sally O’Neill shares women don’t eat enough protein at breakfast and how boost intake

Fitness coach shares the nutrient four in five Aussie women don’t get enough of at breakfast – and how to boost your intake now

  • Fitness coach Sally O’Neill, from Sydney, said four in five women lack protein
  • She said of her clients, 80 per cent don’t get enough at breakfast time
  • To keep cravings at bay and eat less through the day, she recommends protein
  • Baked beans on protein toast, mango smoothie and tofu scramble are all good

A fitness coach has shared why four in five Australian women don’t get enough protein at breakfast time, and how you can quickly and easily boost your intake now.

Sally O’Neill, from Sydney, said a ‘shocking 80 per cent’ of her female clients get ‘less than the recommended amount of protein at breakfast’, and many of them don’t eat breakfast at all.

‘It makes sense your body would require more fuel in the morning than in the evening, so why not try incorporating a high protein brekkie and see how your cravings drop and blood sugar normalizes each day?’ Sally posted on instagram.

A fitness coach shared why four in five Australian women don't get enough protein at breakfast time, and how you can quickly and easily boost your intake now (Sally O'Neill pictured)

A fitness coach shared why four in five Australian women don’t get enough protein at breakfast time, and how you can quickly and easily boost your intake now (Sally O’Neill pictured)

Sally (pictured), from Sydney, said a 'shocking 80 per cent' of her female clients get 'less than the recommended amount of protein at breakfast', and many of them don't eat breakfast at all

Sally (pictured), from Sydney, said a 'shocking 80 per cent' of her female clients get 'less than the recommended amount of protein at breakfast', and many of them don't eat breakfast at all

Sally (pictured), from Sydney, said a ‘shocking 80 per cent’ of her female clients get ‘less than the recommended amount of protein at breakfast’, and many of them don’t eat breakfast at all

She added that women who eat some form of protein with their breakfast often find they are far less likely to overeat later.

The nutritionist and fitness coach said there are many good sources of protein which work well at breakfast time, including baked beans on toast, a mango smoothie and tofu scrambled eggs.

‘Whether you’re trying to maintain a healthy weight or working towards a goal, incorporating protein into your breakfast is vitally important,’ Sally said.

‘Protein, an essential macronutrient, helps build muscle, repair and grow new tissue, and it aids with weight loss.’

Sally said boosting your protein intake at breakfast will ensure you keep cravings at bay all day, and one of the best options is baked beans on high protein toast (pictured)

Sally said boosting your protein intake at breakfast will ensure you keep cravings at bay all day, and one of the best options is baked beans on high protein toast (pictured)

She added: ‘A high protein breakfast sets the tone for the rest of the day. It can keep you feeling full for longer, so you’re less likely to snack here and there.

‘Consuming a protein-rich diet has even been associated with healthier eating.’

Sally highlighted one particular study that found that increasing the amount of protein ‘even slightly’ in a person’s intake from 18-20 per cent improved the quality of food choices they made, including ‘less refined grains and added sugar and more green veggies’.

When it comes to how much protein you actually need, Sally said the best rule of thumb to think about is 1.8-2kg per kg of body weight per day(high protein mango smoothie pictured)

When it comes to how much protein you actually need, Sally said the best rule of thumb to think about is 1.8-2kg per kg of body weight per day(high protein mango smoothie pictured)

When it comes to how much protein you actually need per day, Sally said the best rule of thumb to think about is 1.8-2kg per kilogram of body weight each day.

‘Most customers struggle to get high protein snacks,’ Sally said.

‘We’re more drawn to convenience foods that are packed with carbs and fat (mostly because they give a bigger hit of pleasurable dopamine).’

Instead, you’re far better off opting for a protein smoothie or protein ball to fill you up and keep cravings at bay.

Sally said a tofu scrambled 'egg' option (pictured) is one of the best ways you can set your protein requirements up for the day

Sally said a tofu scrambled ‘egg’ option (pictured) is one of the best ways you can set your protein requirements up for the day

To make Sally’s high protein baked beans on toast, she said you simply need to use two slices of Herman Brot high protein bread, 220 grams of baked beans and two tablespoons of nutritional yeast.

Her high protein mango smoothie can be made with of calcium-fortified soy milk, one cup of frozen mango, one scoop of Macro Mike protein, one flat tablespoon of peanut butter, one tablespoon of hemp seeds, one tablespoon of chia seeds and one brazil nut.

Finally, Sally said to recreate her tofu scramble, you’ll need 150 grams of firm tofu, one tablespoon of nutritional yeast, half a cup of mushrooms and tomatoes, two slices of Herman Brot bread and two tablespoons of hummus.

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